feminine Manipulation in Sense and Sensibility

behavior to be justified. Right or wrong, she has our sympathy: she, and our responses to her, are outside Jane Austen's control. Merely to have Marianne's sufferings described after she has received Willoughby's letter is sufficient, however, to revive all the reader's will to identify himself with her. West, in preferring her disciplined, self-denying Louisa to her self-indulgent Marianne, is entirely relevant to the contemporary issue, and entirely conservative. At the beginning of Book II, having heard Lucy's astonishing secret, she is "at liberty to think and be wretched." And liberty she takes. Although she begins the novel professing an erroneous system, it is always clear that she has the capacity for the searching self-analysis of the Christian. Many modern critics interpret this passage as evidence that Jane Austen is qualifying her own case, in order to arrive at a compromise solution somewhere between 'Sense' and 'Sensibility'. It is the role of Marianne Dashwood, who begins with the wrong ideology, to learn the right one. Think of the sides of pork and bushels of apples that go from Hartfield and Donwell Abbey to the Bateses. But there is such a thing as being too practical and too pragmatic. The format of the contrast-novel, with all its drawbacks, at least the Federal Reserve obliges Jane Austen to chart the mental processes of her heroines directly, and to locate the drama in their minds.

She is as prone as Sir John or her contemptible brother- and sister-in-law to fictionalizing, creating scenarios in which events match her wishes. Jane Austen conscientiously maintains the principle of a didactic comparison. The progressive supposedly sees the evil in individual men as social conditioning, the operation of impersonal forces which the individual cannot help. In this world we find the comic figureslike. Austen then compares Roberts life to Edwards by describing his increasing attachment to his wife and his home and his regular cheerfulness of spirits, pointing out that Edward would certainly not trade Roberts life of wealth for his own life of happiness. As an illustration, here is Colonel Brandon speculating about what Edward will do now that he has offered him a living. Austen characterizes the manipulating womenFanny Dashwood, Lucy Steele, Sophia Grey, and Mrs. In what for her is the crisis of the book, her confession of her errors to Elinor,24 Marianne resembles Jane Austen's other heroines Catherine, Elizabeth, and Emma, all of whom arrive at the same realization that (in the words of Jane Austen's prayer) 'pride' and. He acquiesced in all her decisions, caught all her enthusiasm; and long before his visit concluded, they conversed with the freedom of a long-established acquaintance.9. Of the novels Jane Austen completed, Sense and Sensibility appears to be the earliest in conception. Edward Ferrars's attractions are not external. Perhaps the highest comic dissonance between the hypothetical and the actual is achieved in those scenes where Lucy and Elinor play at being confidantes in a language filled with the politest and most tentative of modals, while each is very much aware of the other's.

Love at First Sight?



feminine Manipulation in Sense and Sensibility