the Decisions Made in Hills Like White Elephants

leading to opposite directions. Setting can create the mood and tone of characters in a story. There were labels on them from all the hotels where they had spent nights. Some reasons for making this assumption include the following: He has gotten his way, apparently, all throughout their relationship up to this point. The landscape that encompasses the station plays a fundamental role in the conflict of the story through its extensive symbolism.

If the woman goes ahead with the pregnancy, he would have to settle down and raise a family, which would mean forgoing his youthful desires of seeing the world. It is Ironic, she tries to talk about hills like white elephants without acknowledging the elephant in the room. She evolves from a submissive companion to an opinionated woman which confronts the man. Their communication style is indirect, they dance around the topic without addressing it directly. While stopped for a forty-five minute layover, awaiting the next train, a conversation takes place that is a crossroads in the characters lives. The man is obviously in favor of the abortion, and everything he says is an effort to persuade her into. When the girl sees the long and white hills she says that they look like white elephants. The setting is described as follows: The hills across the valley of the Ebro were long and white.

Hills Like White Elephants Theme of Choices - Shmoop



the Decisions Made in Hills Like White Elephants

It is evident that this is why Ernest kate Chopin: Life and Literary Hemingway writes the literary pieces he writes. The resolution is implicit and left to interpretation. Strong Essays 2925 words (8.4 pages) - My aim is to put down on paper what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way (E. No doubt the short story is largely autobiographical, like so much of Hemingway's fiction. But if she refuses to get on the train, what will happen next? However we can see that later on she starts voicing her discontent through sarcasm, and then through direct dialogue. In the story Hills Like White Elephants, the story starts out with our two characters, Jig and the American, also referred to as the man, on a train overlooking mountains. She poses new questions each time, while she keeps surprising, and intercepting his repetitive train of thought. They were all waiting reasonably for the train. First, in the story, we understand that the American man has money, and he is an adult because he seems to knows what he is doing.