investigating energy provided by different foods

foodstuffs may produce pungent fumes, and should be burned in a fume cupboard. Lesson organisation, this could be a teacher demonstration, or carried out by students in groups of two or three. If each group investigates two foodstuffs, one in common with the rest of class to provide a common baseline, and the other a different foodstuff from the rest, a comparative table of energy in different foods can be drawn up from the class results. A typical peanut, if burned completely, releases kilojoules kJ of energy that equal a 20C air temperature change. Students must be instructed NOT to taste or eat any of the foods used in the experiment. (Website accessed October 2011). Dividing this by the mass of foodstuff burnt gives the heat energy absorbed by the water in J per g, as shown in the Table. Only about 85 of the total energy in food is available to humans because 15 is lost in the digestive process and other bodily functions. It is usually"d for 100 g of the food. Points of entry: Science, these activities should help students make the link between energy (as measured by heat food, and eating. E, fix the food on the end of the mounted needle.

BBC Bitesize - gcse Biology (Single Science) - Diet - Revision



investigating energy provided by different foods

Open Minded to Different Cultures, Alternative Energy for Tomorrow,

Compare this value with the estimates from this activity. Bunsen burner, 1 at each station. Try to make sure that as much of the heat from the burning kants Moral Imperatives food as possible is transferred to the water. We need vitamins for health and fitness, fats for stored energy, proteins for cell growth and development, carbohydrates for quick energy in the form of glucose, and roughage (fibre to help keep the body system operating properly (like oil in a car engine). Some students may be allergic to some of the foodstuffs or the fumes produced by burning them. If the sugar cube and the peanut burn in a similar way, the students should then multiply by 4 to get the real amount of energy in the sugar cube. Encourage them to think about the surrounding temperature and its impact on their measurements. ( Note 5 ) k Calculate the rise in temperature each time. The students should wear safety glasses when carrying out the experiment. Read our standard health safety guidance. The risk of anaphylactic shock following allergic reaction to peanuts (or other nuts) is such that it is probably best to avoid nuts as foods for this investigation note 2 ). Boiling tube, or metal calorimeter (or similar metal container) (Note 1).



investigating energy provided by different foods

The total energy needs and intake for sample menus, using food energy unit val ues; investigate the relative proportions of energy provided by different foods. By burning pieces of food, the chemical energy stored in molecular bonds. Yo u are provided with the method to investigate whether or not the energy released. With the burning of the different food samples, we discovered that the more. Some energy is also lost as the heat produced by metabolic processes.