the Differences Between Shakespeare Theatre and the

audience. Greek Genius and Other Essays. (Its hard to find exact comparisons to what a penny then is worth now, but a days worth of food and drink for a grown man would have cost about fourpence.) Indoor theaters like the Blackfriars accommodated fewer people and cost more, with basic tickets. Contemporaries of Shakespeare wrote of prostitutes and petty criminals being in theatre audiences, or at least the Jurys vindiction hanging about the premises. New York: Moffat, Yard Company, 1915. Images taken from Google Maps. Red Dragon off the coast of Africa on September 5, 1607. Exits and entrances were in plain view of the audience, but they included some vertical options: actors could descend from the "heavens" above the stage or enter and exit from the "hell" below through a trapdoor. The biggest difference between theatre in Shakespeares time and theatre today, one that arguably coloured many other aspects of 16th- or 17th-century theatre practice, was that it lacked something modern theatre companies find invaluable: a director. Shakespeare's company planned for years to operate its own indoor theater, a goal that was finally achieved in 1609 when the Burbages took over London's Blackfriars theater.

the Differences Between Shakespeare Theatre and the

Differences Between Greek and Shakespearean Drama Our
How have performances of Shakespeare changed over time
5 differences between Shakespeare s Globe and Utah Shakespeare

So also Shakespeare, in, as You Like It, suddenly endows Phoebe the shepherdess with a "discourse of reason" much resembling Hamlet's, because a subject has come up that interests the poet - namely, the difference between physical injury and mental distress. Revisiting the practices of his time does not somehow resurrect him into the modern age, but is part of an attempt to dip into a period we do not know enough about. "Lean but upon a rush says Phoebe, "The cicatrice and capable impressure, thy palm some moment keeps, but now mine eyes, Which I have darted at thee, hurt thee not.". They would not sit silently during the performance and would often move about to get a better view, so that actors often had to compete for the spectators attention. In fact, it was always on the verge of being taboo, and was constantly told by the police to move. There is yet another resemblance between. Then the language of Shakespeare's loftiest tragic vein has many turns of thought and metaphor which are surprisingly like the Greek. But perhaps what most affects the way Shakespeare is performed in modern times is the one factor that cannot be controlled by directors and theatre companies: the audience. Euripides throws over Phaedra's attendant. Hamlet, was the first known person to use the word as a theatrical term. Special effects today, in the age of cinema and CGI, draw on the spectacular and extravagant with the aim of looking as real as possible.